Feb 23, 2024

VetStem at Western Veterinary Conference

Posted by Bob under VetStem

We are back from another trip to Las Vegas for the annual Western Veterinary Conference (WVC). WVC is one of the largest veterinary conferences in the field and VetStem has exhibited at this show for nearly 20 years.

Trade shows like WVC provide us with a platform to engage with and inform veterinarians and veterinary technicians from all over the country about the benefits of VetStem Cell Therapy and how to integrate it into their clinical practice. These events offer an excellent opportunity to connect with both current and prospective clients to discuss all things regenerative medicine.

The attendance this year was record breaking at over 20,000 people. We thoroughly enjoyed engaging in conversations with our colleagues and fellow animal lovers. And of course we loved getting to meet all sorts of cute animals! Enjoy some pictures from the show below.

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Feb 16, 2024

Veterinary Assistant Appreciation Week

Posted by Bob under Veterinary Medicine

As Veterinary Assistant Appreciation Week comes to an end, we would like to recognize the invaluable contributions of these professionals in the world of animal care. Veterinary assistants play a crucial role in ensuring the smooth operation of veterinary clinics and hospitals, providing essential support to veterinarians and technicians. From comforting anxious pets to assisting with surgical procedures, their dedication and compassion are apparent in every aspect of their work.

Beyond their technical skills, veterinary assistants often serve as a reassuring presence for both animals and their people, offering empathy and support during challenging times. This week is an opportunity for us all to express gratitude for their hard work and unwavering commitment to the well-being of animals.

At VetStem, numerous members of our team began their careers as veterinary assistants. This foundational experience facilitated a seamless transition into the field of regenerative veterinary medicine. The dedication and diligence inherent in their roles as veterinary assistants continues to translate into their work at VetStem.

Whether it’s cleaning kennels, administering medications, or assisting veterinarians and owners with stem cell questions, veterinary assistants demonstrate a level of devotion that deserves recognition and appreciation. Let’s celebrate their vital role in the veterinary field and express our heartfelt thanks for the compassion and care they bring to their work every single day.

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Oct 20, 2023

VetStem had a busy week attending veterinary conferences!

Posted by Bob under Veterinary Medicine, VetStem

We spent the better part of last week attending two different veterinary conferences. We love attending these shows as they are a great way to meet with existing and potential clients to talk all things regenerative veterinary medicine. They allow us the opportunity to speak to and educate veterinarians and veterinary technicians from all over the country about VetStem Cell Therapy and how they can implement this therapeutic modality in their practice.

The first part of the week was spent in Atlantic City for the Fetch Coastal veterinary conference. This is a smaller group consisting primarily of small animal veterinarians. Many showed interest in regenerative medicine and our platelet-rich plasma options. Fetch hosts multiple shows throughout the U.S. We attended Fetch DVM360 in Kansas City in August and will attend Fetch Long Beach later this year.

Over the weekend, the team was in Memphis for the annual American Association of Feline Practitioners conference. AAFP is a great show with tons of enthusiastic cat vets. Many veterinarians at this conference show interest in our clinical research programs, such as inflammatory bowel disease, gingivostomatitis, and renal disease, as these conditions tend to be prevalent in cats and have limited treatment options.

If you missed us at these shows, don’t worry! Show season is not over yet! You can find VetStem at the American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) conference and Fetch Long Beach in late November/Early December. And we will of course be back in Las Vegas in February for the Western Veterinary Conference.

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Sep 15, 2023

Common Signs of Pain in Pets

Posted by Bob under Pain in Pets, Veterinary Medicine

For those who missed our last few blogs, September was declared Animal Pain Awareness Month by the International Veterinary Academy of Pain Management (IVAPM). Animal Pain Awareness Month was established to raise awareness and to help veterinary professionals and pet owners recognize and manage pain in animals.

Unfortunately, recognizing pain in our pets is not always easy. Some instances of acute pain are likely to be more obvious, such as pain from an injury or surgical procedure. However chronic pain tends to come on more slowly and thus, we may not recognize the signs for a while. An example of chronic pain is pain from osteoarthritis.

As part of their efforts to educate pet parents about recognizing pain in pets, the IVAPM has a list of the most common signs of pain. They are:

  • Decreased activity – Take notice if your animal is not playing as much as usual
  • Not going up or down stairs – This could be an early sign of osteoarthritis
  • Reluctance to jump onto surfaces – This especially applies to cats
  • Difficulty standing after laying down – This is a sign of osteoarthritis
  • Decreased appetite – This can signal mouth pain
  • Over grooming or licking a particular area – This can be a sign of referred pain

For a more comprehensive list of the common signs of pain in dogs and cats, visit the IVAPM website.

Additionally, they have put together checklists for dogs and cats that can be used to help determine if your pet is in pain.

While September is Animal Pain Awareness Month, it’s a good idea to keep an eye out for these potential signs of pain at all times. If you notice that your pet is exhibiting any of these signs, a trip to your vet may be in order.

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Sep 8, 2023

The International Veterinary Academy of Pain Management

Posted by Bob under Pain in Pets, Veterinary Medicine

As discussed in last week’s blog, September is Animal Pain Awareness Month. Animal Pain Awareness Month was created by the International Veterinary Academy of Pain Management (IVAPM) and is dedicated to raising awareness to help veterinary professionals and pet owners recognize and manage pain in animals. But who is IVAPM? In this week’s blog, we will discuss the IVAPM and their important mission in veterinary medicine.

Who is IVAPM?

The International Veterinary Academy of Pain Management (IVAPM) was founded in 2001 by a group of veterinarians, including one of VetStem’s earliest users and collaborators, Dr. Jamie Gaynor. The organization evolved over the years and today, is led by an active board of directors to provide veterinary pain management education as well as a pain management certification program. The current president of IVAPM, Dr. Douglas Stramel, is also an avid VetStem user.

The IVAPM unites veterinary professionals across all disciplines from around the world to advocate for best practices in the treatment of pain in animals. The organization is committed to encouraging pain management for all animal species through education and advocacy. They also encourage various veterinary organizations to raise public awareness about pain and pain management as it pertains to veterinary patients. IVAPM is the leading forum and educational resource for veterinary professionals and pet owners interested in animal pain prevention, management, and treatment.

IVAPM Pain Management Forum

One of the primary goals of IVAPM is to educate the veterinary community to recognize and treat pain in all species of animals. IVAPM provides continuing education on a variety of topics around the world. As mentioned above, they also provide the only interdisciplinary pain management certification program for veterinary professionals.

In addition to these efforts, IVAPM puts on an annual Pain Management Forum to bring together like-minded veterinary professionals who all advocate for the best practices in the treatment of animals in pain. In both 2022 and 2023, VetStem exhibited and sponsored labs at the Forum. 2024 will bring the third annual Pain Management Forum.

Resources for Pet Owners

The IVAPM does not solely focus on educating veterinary professionals. Pet owners play a key role in both recognizing and managing their pet’s pain. Thus, the IVAPM has several resources for pet owners as well. Through their website, pet owners can search for Certified Veterinary Pain Practitioners and also find various resources to help determine if a pet is in pain.

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Feb 24, 2023

VetStem at the 2023 Western Veterinary Conference

Posted by Bob under Veterinary Medicine, VetStem

The VetStem Sales and Marketing team just returned from several days at the 2023 Western Veterinary Conference (WVC) in Las Vegas. These veterinary conferences are a great way to meet with existing and potential clients to talk all things regenerative veterinary medicine. WVC is one of the largest veterinary industry shows in the nation and VetStem has exhibited at this show for over 15 years.

Veterinary trade shows allow us the opportunity to speak to and educate veterinarians and veterinary technicians from all over the country about VetStem Cell Therapy and how they can implement this therapeutic modality in their practice. Many veterinarians show interest in our clinical research programs, such as inflammatory bowel disease and renal disease, as these conditions tend to have limited treatment options.

This year, we were excited to give attendees a sneak peak at an upcoming product. Unfortunately, it’s too early to spill the beans here, but it’s definitely something to get excited about! Follow VetStem on Facebook and Instagram to keep up with our latest news and announcements.

Perhaps most exciting was the fact that Mick, who belongs to VetStem CEO, Dr. Bob Harman, made his official trade show debut! He did great and was the perfect gentleman in the booth. Though still a puppy, he is doing wonderfully with his training.

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Feb 10, 2023

Veterinary Assistant Appreciation Week

Posted by Bob under Veterinary Medicine

Next week is Veterinary Assistant Appreciation Week! Veterinary Assistant Appreciation Week was only recently started by The Stephen & Christine Schwarzman Animal Medical Center in 2022. Since most of our staff are former veterinary assistants, we wanted to take a moment to acknowledge these key players in your pet’s veterinary care.

Veterinary assistants are an integral part of the veterinary team. As you may have guessed, their job is to assist veterinarians and licensed veterinary technicians in all aspects of patient care. Some of their responsibilities may include ensuring patient comfort, sterilizing and preparing animal care equipment and facilities, animal restraint, as well as patient and client advocacy.

At VetStem, one of our main focuses is on education. We want to ensure that veterinarians and their team are educated and informed about VetStem Cell Therapy so they can answer their clients’ questions about treatment with stem cells. We understand that sometimes veterinary assistants are the messengers when it comes to explaining the VetStem process. As such, we do our best to make sure that all members of the veterinary team are informed about the ins and outs of stem cell therapy.

To do this, we offer online learning modules that are open to veterinarians and their team. We also provide local in-person and remote lunch and learns. This gives us a great opportunity to educate the entire team about VetStem Cell Therapy while also showing our appreciation by providing them with lunch.

We understand the value and knowledge that veterinary assistants bring to the team and know that veterinarians couldn’t do what they do without them! So if you get the chance, consider thanking your veterinary assistants next week.

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Sep 30, 2022

The Use of VetStem Cell Therapy in Veterinary Pain Practice

Welcome to the final week of Animal Pain Awareness Month and our pain themed blogs. This week, we’d like to introduce you to a veterinary pain specialist and VetStem user, Dr. Douglas Stramel. But first, meet his patient, Koda.

Koda, a Labrador retriever, was approximately nine years old when he began to show signs of slowing down. His owners reported that he was limping and seemed unhappy. His left elbow became swollen and x-rays revealed that he had elbow osteoarthritis. His veterinarian at the time drained his elbow and administered a steroid injection. This same procedure was performed twice in three months with minimal improvement.

Fortunately for Koda, his owners sought out Dr. Douglas Stramel, a Certified Veterinary Pain Practitioner. This certification is offered through the International Veterinary Academy of Pain Management (IVAPM) for both veterinarians and veterinary technicians. According to Dr. Stramel, “This certification indicates that someone successfully completed advanced training in pain management. Certification holders demonstrate an advanced knowledge in assessing, diagnosing, and treating painful conditions in animals.”

Koda, getting his PT in an underwater treadmill.

Often, the most effective pain management requires a multimodal approach. For instance, Dr. Stramel’s practice, Advanced Care Veterinary Services, offers numerous services aimed at controlling and correcting pain in pets including surgery, acupuncture, laser therapy, rehabilitation, and regenerative medicine. In Koda’s case, Dr. Stramel utilized medication, shockwave therapy, hyaluronic acid injections, and also recommended treatment with VetStem Cell Therapy.

Dr. Stramel has been providing VetStem Cell Therapy for his patients since 2008 and has even treated his own dog. Stem cells are regenerative cells that can differentiate into many tissue types and have demonstrated the ability to reduce pain and inflammation, help to restore range of motion, and stimulate regeneration of tendon, ligament, and joint tissues. In a peer-reviewed study of dogs with chronic osteoarthritis of the elbow it was found that stem cells reduced lameness and pain.

To being the process, Dr. Stramel collected fat tissue from Koda’s abdomen in a minimally invasive anesthetic procedure. The fat was aseptically packaged and shipped to the VetStem processing laboratory in Poway, California. Lab technicians processed the fat to extract and concentrate the stem and regenerative cells contained therein. The cells were divided into doses, and two injectable doses were shipped to Dr. Stramel for treatment. Approximately 48 hours after the initial fat collection procedure, Koda received one dose of his own stem cells into his elbow and one dose intravenously.

Koda’s owners were very pleased with the results of his stem cell therapy. His mom stated, “Koda can now go up and down the stairs when he wants to and not struggle. He had been hesitant to go on walks for a period of time prior to the stem cell therapy but now there is no hesitation. Koda’s spirit is uplifted and he seems very cheerful and comfortable.” After Koda’s great response, his owner stated that she would recommend stem cell therapy to other dog owners.


That concludes VetStem’s pain-themed blogs for Animal Pain Awareness Month. We hope you enjoyed this blog series and learned a bit about pain in pets. If you think your pet may be in pain or if you think your pet may benefit from treatment with VetStem Cell Therapy, speak to your veterinarian or contact us to receive a list of VetStem providers near you.

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Sep 2, 2022

The International Veterinary Academy of Pain Management

Posted by Bob under Pain in Pets, Veterinary Medicine

It’s officially Animal Pain Awareness Month. Each September, we devote the entire month of VetStem blogs to this very important topic. Animal Pain Awareness Month was created by the International Veterinary Academy of Pain Management (IVAPM) and is dedicated to raising awareness to help veterinary professionals and pet owners recognize and manage pain in animals.

Who is IVAPM?

The International Veterinary Academy of Pain Management (IVAPM) was founded in 2001 by a group of veterinarians, including one of VetStem’s earliest users and collaborators, Dr. Jamie Gaynor. The organization evolved over the years and today, is led by an active board of directors to provide veterinary pain management education as well as a pain management certification program.

The IVAPM unites veterinary professionals across all disciplines from around the world to advocate for best practices in the treatment of pain in animals. The organization is committed to encouraging pain management for all animal species through education and advocacy. They also encourage various veterinary organizations to raise public awareness about pain and pain management as it pertains to veterinary patients. IVAPM is the leading forum and educational resource for veterinary professionals and pet owners interested in animal pain prevention, management, and treatment.

IVAPM Board of Directors

The IVAPM has an active board of directors that includes veterinarians and specialized veterinary technicians primarily from the United States. The current President of IVAPM is an experienced VetStem user, Dr. Douglas Stramel. Dr. Stramel has been utilizing VetStem Cell Therapy since early 2008. Stem cells have the ability to directly modulate pain, which we will discuss in a blog later this month.

IVAPM Pain Management Forum

One of the primary goals of IVAPM is to educate the veterinary community to recognize and treat pain in all species of animals. IVAPM provides continuing education on a variety of topics around the world. As mentioned above, they also provide the only interdisciplinary pain management certification program for veterinary professionals.

In addition to these efforts, IVAPM launched the very first Pain Management Forum earlier this year. VetStem sponsored a dry lab with Dr. Douglas Stramel in which he discussed VetStem Cell Therapy as one of several pain management modalities he employs in his practice.

Resources for Pet Owners

The IVAPM does not solely focus on educating veterinary professionals. Pet owners play a key role in both recognizing and managing their pet’s pain. Thus, the IVAPM has several resources for pet owners as well. Through their website, pet owners can search for Certified Veterinary Pain Practitioners and also find various resources to help determine if a pet is in pain.

Stay tuned for more Pain Awareness themed blogs all month long!

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Aug 5, 2022

Veterinary Care for Retired Police Dogs

Recently, an article was published that described a new bill that was signed into law in Florida. Bill 226 established the Care for Retired Police Dogs program to create a $300,000 recurring funds program under the Florida Department of Law Enforcement to provide subsidized veterinary care for retired law enforcement dogs.

Police dogs are often worked hard and can occasionally become injured on the job. According to the article, “The Care for Retired Police Dogs Program will provide a reimbursement of up to $1,500 of the annual veterinary costs associated with caring for a retired police dog. This includes annual wellness checks, vaccinations, parasite prevention treatments, medications, and emergency care for the animals.”

At VetStem, we have a tender spot for police dogs. We have actually provided cell therapy services for a number of police dogs throughout the years. One common injury among working dogs occurs in the semitendinosus muscle, which is part of the hamstring muscle group. Injury to this muscle can result in a buildup of fibrosis, or scar tissue, which causes the muscle to contract and shorten. This contracture leads to lameness and an abnormal gait in the affected dog.

This condition, known as semitendinosus myopathy, can be career-ending for working dogs. Traditional treatments include rest, medication, rehabilitation, and surgery. Unfortunately, none of these methods have been fully successful, and many dogs do not return to their full activity.

That’s where VetStem comes in! We contributed to a study to evaluate the use of stem cells to treat semitendinosus myopathy and the results were incredibly promising. The study included eight working police K-9s that were diagnosed with semitendinosus myopathy. Each dog was treated with VetStem Cell Therapy and all eight dogs returned to active police work. In addition, each dog’s gait returned to normal.

We recognize the importance of the work that these dogs do, and the fact that many of them risk injury and even put their lives on the line. The new bill in Florida is just a small step to show our gratitude for the sacrifices these hard-working dogs make. At VetStem, we are pleased to contribute what we can to help keep police and other working dogs happy and healthy long into their retirement years.

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