Archive for the ‘Stem Cell Therapy’ Category

Sep 29, 2023

Pain Practitioner Treats Agility Dog with VetStem Cell Therapy

As we wrap up Animal Pain Awareness Month, we wanted to share a VetStem Cell Therapy success story. As you may remember from last week’s blog, stem cells have the ability to directly modulate pain, thereby leading to increased comfort and an improved quality of life. This particular patient was treated by the President-Elect of the International Veterinary Academy of Pain Management, Dr. Douglas Stramel. Dr. Stramel, who owns and practices at Advanced Care Veterinary Services, is the first and only Certified Veterinary Pain Practitioner in the Dallas/Fort Worth area.

Kim

As the President of IVAPM, Dr. Stramel takes pain management very seriously and has made it a primary focus of his veterinary practice. He employs advanced multi-modal pain management protocols including physical therapy, acupuncture, shock wave, laser therapy, and, you guessed it, regenerative medicine. Dr. Stramel has been a longtime user of VetStem Cell Therapy and has treated nearly 50 patients. Thus, when Kim, a German Shepherd and trained agility dog, presented with a partially torn cruciate ligament, he recommended treatment with stem cells.

To begin the VetStem process, Dr. Stramel collected a sample of fat tissue from Kim’s abdomen during a minimally invasive anesthetic procedure. The fat was shipped to the VetStem laboratory where technicians processed the fat to extract and concentrate the stem and regenerative cells contained therein. Three doses were prepared and shipped to Dr. Stramel for injection and the rest of Kim’s cells were put into cryopreservation for potential future use. Approximately 48 hours after the initial fat collection procedure, Kim received an injection of her own stem cells into each knee as well as an intravenous injection.

According to her owner, Kim had a great response to stem cell therapy and her knee is still doing well. She was even able to return to competition! Her owner stated, “Kim’s stem cell injection has provided her an opportunity to live her best life. We decided to change sports, so she now does AKC Rally and UKC Nosework. She continues with rehab to keep her knee in the best possible shape. Her rehab includes cold laser, underwater treadmill, and acupuncture therapy every 2-3 months.”

While stem cells have many mechanisms of action, studies focusing on the ability to directly affect acute and chronic pain have been relatively recent. Stem cells can also down-regulate inflammation and contribute to tissue regeneration, all of which helped to get Kim feeling better.

If you think your pet may benefit from VetStem Cell Therapy, speak to your veterinarian or contact us to receive a list of VetStem providers near you.

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Aug 11, 2023

VetStem Cell Therapy for Feline Kidney Disease

VetStem Cell Therapy, while commonly used to treat orthopedic conditions in dogs and horses, has also been successfully used to treat a number of other diseases. One such disease is kidney disease in cats. Nearly 250 cats have received VetStem Cell Therapy for kidney disease.

Kidney disease is one of the most common causes of sickness and death in cats. Common symptoms can include weight loss, lethargy, variable appetite, and poor coat quality. Some cats may also drink and urinate more, vomit, or have diarrhea.

Unfortunately, treatment options for cats with kidney disease are limited and can be costly. The good news is, based upon our own data as well as the data of others, we believe that stem cells may help improve the symptoms and quality of life in some cats with kidney disease. In fact, a review of a small number of feline patients treated with VetStem Cell Therapy showed that blood kidney values were slightly to moderately improved after treatment.

Anecdotal data from pet owners and veterinarians suggests that treatment with VetStem Cell Therapy helps to improve symptoms associated with kidney disease. Owners have reported improved appetites, weight gain, and increased energy. That being said, more data is necessary regarding the use of VetStem Cell Therapy for cats with kidney disease. Thus, we continue to research the use of stem cells for this condition under one of VetStem’s clinical research programs.

If you think your cat may benefit from treatment with VetStem Cell Therapy, speak to your veterinarian or contact us to receive a list of qualified VetStem providers near you.

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Aug 4, 2023

Assistance Dog Day: Max’s VetStem Cell Therapy Success Story

August 4th is Assistance Dog Day and next week is International Assistance Dog Week. This is a time to recognize and honor the hard work and selfless love that assistance dogs provide day in and day out. As you probably know, assistance dogs are specially trained to perform specific tasks for people with disabilities. These disabilities can be physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or mental. There are many types of assistance dogs including guide dogs for the blind, medical and hearing alert dogs, mobility assistance dogs, and more. In this week’s blog, we are going to share a special story about a psychiatric service dog named Max.

Max

Max has been a trained companion for U.S. Army Staff Sergeant Edward Johnson since 2014. Sgt. Johnson, a purple heart recipient, was shot in the head during combat in Iraq in 2006 and was left with a traumatic brain injury. Max helps Sgt. Johnson cope with PTSD and other debilitating ailments related to his injuries.

Unfortunately, Max tore his cruciate ligament in his knee. As a common injury in large breed dogs, cruciate ligament tear is one of the biggest reasons for hind limb lameness, pain, and subsequent knee arthritis in dogs. Additionally, according to the American College of Veterinary Surgeons, 40-60% of dogs who injure one cruciate ligament will go on to injure the other cruciate ligament in the future.

Max was obviously in pain and in need of surgery and other medical procedures. Fortunately, his story made the news and through donations and good will, Max was able to have surgery and treatment with VetStem Cell Therapy. His surgeon, Dr. Jeff Christiansen of Superior Veterinary Surgical Solutions, donated his services and organized donations from several others as well. As an experienced VetStem provider, Dr. Christiansen recommended stem cell and platelet therapy in conjunction with the surgery to aid Max’s healing. VetStem provided a free platelet therapy kit as well as discounted stem cell processing services.

According to Dr. Christiansen, Max recovered completely. But as is common, Max suffered a second cruciate ligament rupture in his other leg just over two years after his first surgery. Once again, Dr. Christiansen and several companies, including VetStem, stepped up to provide this dog with top-notch care. Max received surgery on his other knee in addition to stem cells and platelet therapy. Max once again recovered well and hasn’t required a repeat stem cell treatment since.

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Jul 14, 2023

VetStem CEO Featured on Fuzzybutts and Friends Podcast

Posted by Bob under Stem Cells, VetStem Cell Therapy

VetStem founder and CEO, Dr. Bob Harman, recently joined Fuzzybutts and Friends on a podcast to discuss VetStem Cell Therapy and the science of stem cells. Joining him is Dr. Angie Zinkus, veterinarian and VetStem enthusiast at Germantown Parkway Animal Hospital. This podcast really gets down to the nitty gritty about stem cells and the various diseases that have been treated with VetStem Cell Therapy. Some of the big questions that are addressed are:

What are stem cells? Where do they come from? What are the mechanisms of action/how do they work? What CAN’T be treated with stem cells? And more!! You don’t want to miss this one!

Click the image below to check out the podcast:

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Jun 16, 2023

VetStem Cell Therapy for Fragmented Coronoid Process

As you probably know, much of the VetStem blog is spent discussing the treatment of arthritis with stem cells. We talk about things like joint dysplasia and cruciate ligament tears as catalysts for the development of arthritis. In today’s blog, we are discussing Fragmented Coronoid Process, or FCP, a developmental defect that causes arthritis in the elbows.

Nikolai Augustus, a Labrador retriever, was 2 years old when he began limping. X-rays revealed he had broken bone fragments in both of his elbows as a result of fragmented coronoid process, or FCP. FCP is one of the main diseases associated with elbow dysplasia. It is a developmental defect of the two small bony protrusions on the end of the ulna, known as the coronoid processes, within the elbow joint. In this condition, one of the bony protrusions develops a fissure or crack and separates from the ulna. FCP may result in instability and pain as well as decreased mobility and swelling.

The treatment of choice for FCP is surgical removal of the bone fragments and any abnormal cartilage. This procedure can be performed arthroscopically by an orthopedic surgeon, which results in a smaller incision and less damage to the supporting elbow structures. In all cases however, regardless of surgical repair, the patient will develop some degree of arthritis. That’s where VetStem comes in!

Niko

Niko’s veterinarian recommended arthroscopy in addition to treatment with VetStem Cell Therapy. Stem cells are regenerative cells that can differentiate into many tissue types and have demonstrated the ability to reduce pain and inflammation, help to restore range of motion, and stimulate regeneration of tendon, ligament, and joint tissues. By using VetStem Cell Therapy in conjunction with surgery, Niko’s vet hoped to delay the progression and reduce the severity of degenerative joint disease in his elbows.

To begin the process, Niko’s vet collected fat tissue from his abdomen in a minimally invasive anesthetic procedure. The fat was aseptically packaged and shipped to the VetStem processing laboratory in Poway, California. Lab technicians processed the fat to extract and concentrate the stem and regenerative cells contained therein. The cells were divided into doses, and two injectable doses were shipped to Niko’s vet for treatment. Approximately 48 hours after the initial fat collection procedure, Niko received one dose of his own stem cells into each elbow.

According to Niko’s owner, he had a great response to the treatment. His owner stated, “One year after surgery and stem cell therapy and Niko is running and playing with the energy of a 3-year-old. We are thankful our vet recommended stem cell therapy for Niko and that he has the bank of stem cells to help treat Niko in the future.”

In addition to the two stem cell doses that were shipped for immediate treatment, several doses of Niko’s stem cells were put into cryopreservation. This is particularly valuable for a patient like Niko who will never have perfect, arthritis-free elbows. In fact, approximately 15 months after his initial treatment, Niko received a follow up treatment identical to his first using some of his banked stem cell doses. Niko’s additional cells will remain in cryopreservation and can be accessed for treatment as needed for the remainder of his life.

If you think your pet may benefit from treatment with VetStem Cell Therapy, contact us to receive a list of providers in your area.

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Jun 2, 2023

VetStem Cell Therapy for Dog with Arthritis and Torn Ligament

Yesterday, June 1st, was International Sheltie Day. To celebrate, we have a blog for you all about Lady, a Sheltie who received VetStem Cell Therapy for arthritis and a cruciate ligament tear.

Lady suffered with arthritis since she was two years old for which she received various medications at different times. When she was eight years old, she tore the cruciate ligament in her left knee. Though her injury required surgical repair, her veterinarian, Dr. Jeff Christiansen of Superior Veterinary Surgical Solutions, recommended treatment with VetStem Cell Therapy in addition to surgery.

Lady

During her knee surgery, Dr. Christiansen collected a sample of fat tissue from her abdomen. The tissue was sent to the VetStem laboratory where it was processed to extract and concentrate the stem and regenerative cells contained therein. Five stem cells doses were prepared and shipped to Dr. Christiansen while the rest of Lady’s stem cells were put into cryopreservation for future use.

In addition to her injured knee, Dr. Christiansen planned to treat Lady’s arthritic joints. Approximately 48 hours after her surgery, Lady received a dose of her own stem cells into her left knee, left hip, and both carpi (wrists), as well as an intravenous dose.

Lady’s owner was very happy with the results of her treatment with VetStem Cell Therapy. She stated, “Prior to the stem cell treatments, Lady had a hard time going from a sit-to-stand position and would go outside for no more than 10 minutes at a time. Now she goes on 30-50 minute walks. She is far more playful than she was before the stem cell treatment. The stem cell treatment has been life changing for my fur baby. I would highly recommend stem cell therapy!”

Lady’s initial treatment was back in 2015. In the following years, she received additional treatments utilizing her stored stem cells to help her maintain a good quality of life. She initially received one intravenous dose roughly every 9-13 months. Approximately two years after her last intravenous dose, she received a round of joint injections in addition to an intravenous dose.

This treatment schedule is not uncommon for a dog with arthritis. Because arthritis is a degenerative disease, stem cells can slow the progression of the disease but ultimately will not cure the condition. This is important to note because many pets will require repeat or routine treatments as they continue to age. Fortunately, VetStem has the ability to both store stem cells and produce more stem cells, should your pet require them in the future. This means that just one fat collection can provide a lifetime supply of stem cells for your pet. Stem cells have been shown to reduce inflammation and pain and to contribute to the regeneration of damaged tissues such as cartilage and tendon/ligament. Interested in VetStem Cell Therapy for your pet? Speak to your veterinarian or contact us to receive a list of VetStem providers near you.

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May 26, 2023

VetStem Cell Therapy Helps Dog with Hip Arthritis

All month long we’ve been discussing arthritis in honor of Arthritis Awareness Month. We’ve covered arthritis in cats and dogs as well as using exercise to manage your pet’s arthritis. Another tool to help reduce symptoms of arthritis and actually help to repair damaged cartilage tissue is VetStem Cell Therapy. This week, to wrap up our month of Arthritis Awareness blogs, we are sharing Gracie’s stem cell success story.

Gracie at the dog park

Gracie, a spirited Golden Retriever, was two years old when she suddenly could not stand up. Prior to this, her personality had changed as well. She went from being a rambunctious, active pup to very calm. It turns out, she was struggling with pain. Her owners immediately took her to the veterinarian where it was determined she has a bad case of bilateral hip dysplasia resulting in osteoarthritis. Hip dysplasia is a deformity of the ball and socket hip joint that occurs during growth. The deformity results in joint laxity (looseness) and eventually leads to osteoarthritis (OA). OA is a painful condition that can greatly reduce a dog’s quality of life.

Fortunately for Gracie, her veterinarian works with VetStem proponent Dr. Angie Zinkus at Germantown Parkway Animal Hospital. Dr. Zinkus has treated multiple arthritic patients with VetStem Cell Therapy and agreed Gracie was a good candidate for the procedure. In this particular case, Dr. Zinkus mentored Dr. Susannah Mays to familiarize her with the VetStem process.

First, Dr. Mays collected fat tissue from Gracie’s abdomen during a minimally invasive anesthetic procedure. The fat was aseptically packaged and shipped to the VetStem processing laboratory in Poway, California. Lab technicians processed the fat to extract and concentrate the stem and regenerative cells contained therein.

Gracie’s cells were divided into doses and a total of nine stem cell injections were shipped to her veterinarian for treatment while the rest were put into cryostorage. Approximately 48 hours after the initial fat collection procedure, Gracie received injections of her own stem cells in her hips, knees, elbows, shoulders, as well as an intravenous injection. According to Dr. Zinkus, though Gracie’s knees, elbows, and shoulders did not show signs of arthritis, she prefers to treat each joint as a preventative measure to help protect against the development of future osteoarthritis.

In addition to stem cell therapy, Gracie received platelet rich plasma (PRP) injections into her joints. PRP and stem cell therapy work synergistically. Concentrated platelets accelerate internal healing processes by attracting stem cells, supporting an anti-inflammatory environment, and stimulating local tissue repair processes.

According to Gracie’s owner, the stem cell and PRP treatment was a huge success! Her owner noted that it only took a few months before they noticed a vast improvement stating, “Gracie is back to her silly self, running as fast as she can to chase our backyard squirrels!! Thank you, VetStem and Dr. Zinkus for this wonderful solution to Gracie’s painful hips.”

Gracie’s story is just one of many that we have received from pet parents. As we discussed in a recent blog, Osteoarthritis is one of the most common diseases in dogs and pain associated with osteoarthritis can greatly reduce a dog’s quality of life. But VetStem Cell Therapy can help! According to surveys answered by owners and veterinarians, greater than 80% of dogs showed an improved quality of life after receiving VetStem Cell Therapy for osteoarthritis.

Curious if your dog may benefit from treatment with VetStem Cell Therapy? Speak to your veterinarian or contact us to receive a list of VetStem providers near you.

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Apr 28, 2023

Guest Blog: VetStem Cell Therapy for My Cat with IBD

Hi all! Veronika here, VetStem’s Customer Service Manager. I’m taking over the blog this week to tell you the story of Gryffin, my cat who received VetStem Cell Therapy for inflammatory bowel disease. Gryffin is an eleven-year-old Ragdoll who rules our house! He has many nicknames including Gryffindorable and the Handsomest of Handsomes! If you haven’t guessed, he has me wrapped around his little fluffy paw.

Gryffin

But recently, he has been experiencing some symptoms that warranted a trip to the vet. My normally floofy boy lost a lot of his beautiful coat. He was vomiting 2-3 times a week, had a reduced appetite and weight loss. Though normally full of catitude, he was acting lethargic and not playing or engaging much with the family or my crazy Frenchie, Darby, and was often isolating.

Gryffin was diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD is a gastrointestinal disease that can affect both cats and dogs. It is characterized by inflammation of the intestines and can cause vomiting, diarrhea, reduced appetite, and weight loss. Numerous cats have received VetStem Cell Therapy for IBD and I’ve heard great results firsthand from some of their owners so I knew exactly what I needed to do.

Gryffin received his first stem cell treatment in February. About a week after that first intravenous injection, I noticed small positive changes. His appetite increased and he was generally a little more upbeat. He was coming out of his shell a little bit and even started climbing to the top of his cat tree again.

Gryffin back on top!

He received a second intravenous stem cell treatment in early March, three weeks after his first treatment. That is when I began to notice more obvious improvements. He now voluntarily plays (by himself or with us). He’s also begun doing “racetrack” around the house again and annoying Darby. His stools have firmed up and he has not vomited in probably a month or more. I even bought him $30 worth of cat toys because I was so excited he wants to play again! His coat has started to come back and he has gained some weight.

I know without a doubt that stem cells helped my sweet boy feel better. I’m so fortunate to work for VetStem and to know about this amazing technology. I want to spread the word to all pet owners who are dealing with IBD, which can be such a frustrating and debilitating disease. If you think VetStem might help your furry friend, don’t hesitate to reach out! You can bring it up to your veterinarian (print out this blog if you want!) or use our Locate a Vet page to find a VetStem vet near you: https://vetstem.com/locatevet.php.  

Check out a video of Gryffin playing with his toy mouse now that he’s feeling better:

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Apr 21, 2023

VetStem Cell Therapy Helps Bulldog with Knee Arthritis

Today is Bulldogs Are Beautiful Day, an unofficial holiday to celebrate all those short-nosed, loveable, goof balls! There are several different types of bulldogs including the English Bulldog and the very popular French Bulldog. In this blog, we want to share the stem cell story of an English Bulldog named Knuckles.

Like several breeds, English Bulldogs are prone to their own array of diseases and complications. One of which is, you guessed it, arthritis. Some bulldogs may be predisposed to joint dysplasia, an inherited condition that causes a malformed joint and osteoarthritis. This active and sometimes overweight breed also runs the risk of cruciate ligament rupture, another condition that can lead to osteoarthritis.

Poor Knuckles not only tore his cruciate ligament, he also had a luxating patella – a knee cap that shifts out of alignment. He underwent surgery to repair both problems but unfortunately the surgery failed. He developed a serious bacterial infection in his knee and the hardware that was placed during surgery had to be removed. After a long course of strong antibiotics, Knuckles’ condition continued to worsen. He lost muscle in the leg and didn’t want to use it, despite being on large amounts of anti-inflammatories, pain medications, joint supplements, and joint injections.

Fortunately, Knuckles was referred to Dr. Holly Mullen, a board-certified veterinary surgeon in San Diego. She determined that the bacterial infection damaged Knuckles’ knee so badly that he no longer had cartilage cushioning the joint, it was bone-on-bone. His pain would likely continue to increase until his only option was amputation. As an alternative, Dr. Mullen recommended treatment with VetStem Cell Therapy.

Knuckles chasing bubbles

To begin the VetStem process, a fat tissue collection was performed, and the tissue was sent to the VetStem laboratory. Due to Knuckles’ unique case, VetStem performed extra sterility testing to ensure his stem cells did not contain traces of bacteria. Additionally, Dr. Mullen tested the fluid in his knee to ensure he was clear of infection. When both tests came back negative, Knuckles received one injection of his own stem cells into his bad knee, and also an IV injection.

According to his owner, knuckles had a great response to the stem cell treatment! She stated, “At 7 years old, Knuckles has basically turned back into a puppy. Thirty days after his treatment, he was able to stop taking any medications at all! He now bears full weight on his leg, and he has gained back almost all of the muscle.” Knuckles was once again able to play with his sister and his best friend, climb up in the bed for snuggles, and do his favorite thing: chase bubbles!

If you think your pet may benefit from VetStem Cell Therapy, speak to your veterinarian or contact us to receive a list of VetStem providers in your area.

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Apr 14, 2023

VetStem Cell Therapy for Puppy with Hip Dysplasia

Arthritis in dogs is hard at any age. But it’s especially heartbreaking when puppies are diagnosed with arthritis. That was the case for Ellie Mae, a hound mix, who was diagnosed with bilateral hip dysplasia resulting in osteoarthritis.

At approximately nine months old, Ellie Mae started limping. Soon after that, she stopped putting any weight on her back left leg and would cry every time she had to get up. Eventually, she stopped wanting to play at all. A trip to the veterinarian revealed that Ellie has osteoarthritis in both hips as a result of hip dysplasia.

Ellie Mae

A hereditary condition, hip dysplasia is a deformity of the ball and socket hip joint that occurs during growth. The deformity results in joint laxity (looseness) and eventually leads to osteoarthritis (OA). OA is a painful condition that can greatly reduce a dog’s mobility and quality of life.

Fortunately for Ellie, her veterinarian Dr. Glenn Behan of Barnegat Animal Clinic, recommended treatment with VetStem Cell Therapy. To begin the process, Dr. Behan collected fat tissue from Ellie Mae in a minimally invasive anesthetic procedure. The fat was shipped to the VetStem laboratory where technicians extracted her stem cells to create doses for treatment and cryopreservation. Approximately 48 hours after the initial fat collection procedure, Ellie Mae received one dose of her own stem cells into each hip.

According to Ellie Mae’s owner, “Nothing worked until the stem cells.” After her treatment with VetStem Cell Therapy, Ellie Mae slowly began to get better. Her owner stated, “It took about 2-3 months after the stem cell treatment, and she was running around like she never had a problem. She loves to run and go on walks with no problems. Rolls around and even shows her belly again when rolling on her back. She is about 15 months old now and is a crazy playful girl and enjoying playing with her sisters once again!”

VetStem Cell Therapy is used by veterinarians to treat a wide variety of injuries and diseases and may provide relief when, as in Ellie Mae’s case, other treatments are not working. VetStem Cell Therapy utilizes the body’s natural healing cells to accelerate and improve the quality of healing for acute conditions and to slow, stop, and ultimately revert the course of chronic diseases. If you think your pet may benefit from treatment with VetStem Cell Therapy, speak to your veterinarian or contact us to receive a list of VetStem providers near you.

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